3 December 2013
The brain prefers paper: Scientific American
TORONTO—Scientific American is backing the benefits of print. Text is better understood and more easily remembered when read on paper, compared to off a screen, says the mag.

"E-ink reflects ambient light just like the ink on a paper book, but computer screens, smart phones and tablets shine light directly on people’s faces. Prolonged reading on glossy, self-illuminated screens can cause eyestrain, headaches and blurred vision," writes Ferris Jabr in a recent article. 

The story cites an experiment by Karlstad University in Sweden where participants took reading comprehension tests on computers or on paper. Those using computers scored lower and reported being more stressed and tired than those who completed the test on paper.

Industry advocate Two Sides has more about the findings on its website. The November issue of Scientific American can be purchased online here. We recommend reading it in print.
Comments:
2. Sf says:
4 December 2013 at 6:13 PM
You cannot deny that print stays around a lot longer and therefore has a much greater effect. If it is easy on the eyes, even better. You won't get an email on a table in a waiting room, on the corner of your kitchen counter or posted to the fridge. Print will always play a role and it's staying power is one of it's best features. No denying it.
1. Akp says:
3 December 2013 at 6:35 PM
Stop arguing about what song to play and get into a life boat. Print is dead and these studies just make printers have another scotch and wait for things get better.
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